JOHN SMITH-AMATO

KYOTO MORNING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Artist John Smith-Amato Opens “Time and Recall” Exhibit at Synchronicity Space Fine Arts

 

NEW YORK, NY (September 13, 2012) – Opening Wednesday, October 3, 2012 and running through Saturday, November 4, the exhibition “Time and Recall: New Paintings and Pastels” will feature recent works of artist John Smith-Amato on display at Synchronicity Space Fine Arts in the West Village, New York City.

 

In this most recent installment of his work, Amato explores semi-abstraction and interplay between the visual and the verbal.  His works address equilibrium between bursts of primary color and the forms to which they allude. His vision, balancing the creative and representational aspects of painting, sometimes hints at, other times directly reflects a harmony between the literal and the abstract.

 

“Art is a context for life: you are who you are and it is revealed in your work,” said Amato.  “If you focus on developing yourself as a practice and fully becoming your best self, your work will reflect that depth and progress. ” 

 

Amato is a recipient of the National Endowment, Prix de Paris (L’ecole des Beaux Arts), and Monbukagakusho (Kyoto University) awards, and a protégé of Pierre Matisse.  He has enjoyed a venerable career in the management and representation of fellow artists, as well as his own development in the visual arts. 

 

Amato has long been fascinated by the implementation of metaphor in life and on the canvas.  In fact, he shifted from a background in writing and study with Lionel Trilling and Comparative Literature at Columbia University towards painting and work with Norman Raeben at Carnegie Hall to bring a more experiential worldview into his work and teaching.  His perspective is that as an artist, you must tie yourself to an ever-evolving moment and constantly rediscover yourself and your art.  More than two decades ago, Amato created Synchronicity Space to realize this sentiment more diversely applied.   

 

“The development of perception is at the core of art and in its’ process, it is how civilization learns how to see and grow.  Art should provide this above all to society and if it does what it is designed to do, it will address the greatest problems in our society: blindness, which underlies the potential of our own humanity,” said Amato. “Destroy blindness; save the world.”

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